HPX Tutorial Promo Video

As a build up for our Supercomputing tutorial, the STE||AR Group has put together a promotional video to generate interest in HPX. The video gives viewer a high level overview of what HPX is and what will be discussed at the tutorial. The SC15 Tutorials Committee will circulate this and other tutorial videos on its YouTube playlist. We would like to thank our colleague Randy Dannenberg and his students for helping us put this together!

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On Tour: HPX Tutorial at SC15!

Howdy! The STE||AR Group welcomes you to participate in a hands on HPX tutorial which will be given this year in Austin, Texas as part of the SC Tutorials program. STE||AR Fellows from Louisiana State University, Friedrich-Alexander Universitat, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, and University of Oregon will present “Massively Parallel Task-Based Programming wih HPX” which will consist of five parts: Continue reading

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Developing HPX with Git: A Tutorial

EDIT: Heller pointed out that “newer subversion versions come with a single .svn directory in the top level directory; the single .git is not the reason why you can have multiple local branches”. And along with his advise to use Git over SSH instead of HTTPS and to deploy the public key with github.com.
EDIT2: revise the “feature change” section and improve workflow.

 

The HPX code base has moved from SVN to Git at github.com. This post is meant to serve as a tutorial to help with the transition.

SVN vs. Git – the Repo Conceptual Difference

From git-scm.com:

Git is a free and open source distributed version control system designed to handle everything from small to very large projects with speed and efficiency.

The distributed nature is reflected in the differences of repo models. As summarized by Ole Morten Amundsen, with a few edits:

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Solving Combination Puzzles – An example HPX application – Part 1

HPX is great for developing applications that run both in a shared memory and distributed memory environment. This is accomplished by leveraging the Active Global Address Space (AGAS). By creating components in AGAS we gain the ability to seamlessly write parallel object oriented applications without the need to manually care about passing messages to different localities of explicitly creating threads. While this idea sounds great it is difficult to think about an implementation which achieves exactly that. As such this blog post is trying to walk you through the development of a recursive back tracking brute force solver for combination puzzles and you will discover that recursion allows us in general to exploit parallelism.

This is the first post in a series. This article series will walk you through the complete lifecycle of an HPX application. From the first basic idea, which is covered in this post to a full fledged HPX application exploiting the unique features of HPX to write programs with a unified semantic for local and possibly remote access to objects. The idea to develop such an application was given by Andreas Schäfer who challenged me to beat his MPI implementation. We’ll see how we fared in the last post of this series.

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