GSoC 2016 Participants Announced!

We can now announce the participants in the STE||AR Group’s 2016 Google Summer of Code! We are very proud to announce the names of those 6 students who this year will be funded by Google to work on projects for our group.

These recipients represent only a handful of the many excellent proposals that we had to choose from. For those unfamiliar with the program, the Google Summer of Code brings together ambitious students from around the world with open source developers by giving each mentoring organization funds to hire a set number of participants. Students then write proposals, which they submit to a mentoring organization, in hopes of having their work funded.

Below are the students who will be working with the STE||AR Group this summer listed with their mentors and their proposal abstracts.


Participant:

Parsa Amini; Louisiana State University, LA, USA

Mentor:

Hartmut Kaiser; Louisiana State University, LA, USA

Project:

HPX Debugger: Debugging distributed HPX applications with regular tools is a tedious task and not always helpful. A distributed debugger that understands HPX-specific data structures such as HPX threads, can list and track parcels, and display debugging information about other data structures is needed.


Participant:

Aalekh Nigam; Jaypee Institute Of Information Technology, Lucknow, India

Mentor:

Patrick Diehl; University of Bonn, Bonn, Germany

Project:

Map/Reduce frameworks are getting more and more popular for big data processing (for example Hadoop). By utilising the unified and standards conforming API of the HPX runtime system, we believe to be able to perfectly represent the Map/Reduce programming model. Many applications would benefit from direct support in HPX. This might include adding Hypertable or similar libraries to the mix to handle the large data sets Map/Reduce is usually used with.


Participant:

Egor Shkorov; Belarusian State University, Minsk, Belarus

Mentor:

Thomas Heller; Friedrich Alexander University, Nuremberg, Germany

Project:

This project is to create a working parcel-port for HPX library using WebSockets with good performance, good debugging tools, logging and good stability.


Participant:

Kuo Lu; Gordon College, College in Wenham, MA, USA

Mentor:

Andreas Schäfer; Friedrich Alexander University, Nuremberg, Germany

Project:

The ultimate goal of this project is to improve user-friendliness of LibGeoDecomp. LibGeoDecomp is capable of simulate many 3-D scientific models, but it might be too complex for new users to use. Command-line tools for force-based time-discrete would be a great demo and introduction to new users. And building command-line tools, creating demos and code examples would be the goal for this summer project


Participant:

Satyaki Upadhyay; Birla Institute of Technology and Science (BITS), Pilani, India

Mentor:

 Arne Hendricks; Friedrich Alexander University, Nuremberg, Germany

Project:

Plugin Mechanism for thread schedulers in HPX: The aim of the project is to make these dynamically loaded instead. These will be converted to the plugin system already present in HPX, which is used by message-handlers and parcel-ports. Factory design pattern will be followed. A scheduler-factory-base class will provide the template from which the factories of the individual schedulers are derived. These will then return scheduler-objects which can be used by executors.


Participant:

Minh-Khanh Do; Friedrich-Alexander-University, Nuremberg, Germany

Mentor:

John Biddiscombe; Swiss Supercomputing Center, Lugano, Switzerland

Project:

Extend existing parallel algorithms of hpx::partitioned_vector to work for the distributed case. At the end of GSoC at least two simple algorithms (i.e. copy_if and copy_n) and one more complicated algorithm (transform_reduce) should be implemented.


Congratulations!

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    About Hartmut Kaiser

    Hartmut is an Adjunct Professor of Computer Science at Louisiana State University. At the same time, he holds the position of a senior scientist at the Center for Computation and Technology (LSU). He received his doctorate from the Technical University of Chemnitz (Germany) in 1988. He is probably best known through his involvement in open source software projects, mainly as the author of several C++ libraries he has contributed to Boost, which are in use by thousands of developers worldwide. His current research is focused on leading the STE||AR group at CCT working on the practical design and implementation of the ParalleX execution model and related programming methods. In addition, he architected and developed the core library modules of SAGA for C++, a Simple API for Grid Applications.

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